Cub Scout Program

Advancement

Cub Scout activities are centered around earning  badges that are specific to each school grade level.  This badge represents a rank.  Advancement refers to the progress a Cub Scout makes toward their badge of rank.  All of the activities for each rank are in the Cub Scout handbooks. 

Adventures

Based on different topics such as hiking, nature, science, citizenship, first aid, sports, and more, adventures are earned as a Cub Scout advances toward their badge of rank.  Once an adventure is completed, a Cub Scout receives recognition in the form of an adventure loop or adventure pin.

Kindergarten through third grade; Lions, Tigers, Wolves, and Bears earn metal adventure loops (shown above).  These are designed to slide onto a Cub Scout’s belt.
Fourth and fifth grade, Webelos, earn metal adventure pins.  These pins are placed on the Webelos Colors (shown at right) or on a Webelos hat.

Awards

There are several awards Cub Scouts can earn beyond their badge of rank.

 In partnership with dozens of faith organizations representing different religions, youth may earn the Religious Emblem of their faith.

The recruiter patch is awarded to Cub Scouts who bring other youth into Scouting.

Youth Uniforms

The uniform is one of the methods of delivering the Scouting program.  In addition to creating a sense of belonging, the uniform gives a Scout the ability to display their personal achievements.

Adult Awards

There are various awards for those who serve as Scout volunteer leaders.  Some have specific requirements and are earned, while others are awarded for exceptional service.  At right are two examples of the many adult awards that are available.

The Den Leader Award is a symbol of quality leadership.                     

The William D. Boyce award is presented to those who start a new Pack, Troop, Crew, or Ship.

Adult Uniforms

The uniform is one of the methods of delivering the Scouting program. Adults who serve youth directly should always be in full uniform to set a good example and to show that they, too, are part of the den and pack.