Cub Scout


Please use the Advancement Report, No.34403, as documentation for the Nova Award. Submit the Supernova Award Application, below, as instructed in the requirements.

Submit any questions regarding the Nova or Supernova awards to program.content@scouting.org

Effective June 1, 2015, the rank requirements for Cub Scouts are changing (see www.scouting.org/programupdates for these new requirements). Cub Scouts currently working on the Nova awards or one of the Supernova awards have two options:

Complete the award no later than December 31, 2015, using the requirements as published in the current Cub Scout Nova Awards Guidebook (No. 34032)
Or
Complete the award using the requirements published here.

    

Science Everywhere

This module is designed to help you explore how science affects your life each day.

  1. Choose A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements.
    1. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show about anything related to science. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

      Some examples include—but are not limited to—shows found on PBS ("NOVA"), Discovery Channel, Science Channel, National Geographic Channel, TED Talks (online videos), and the History Channel. You may choose to watch a live performance or movie at a planetarium or science museum instead of watching a media production. You may watch online productions with your counselor's approval and under your parent's supervision.

    2. Read (about one hour total) about anything related to science. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

      Books on many topics may be found at your local library. Examples of magazines include but are not limited to Odyssey, KIDS DISCOVER, National Geographic Kids, Highlights, and OWL or owlkids.com.

    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about anything related to science. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  2. Complete ONE adventure from the following list. (Choose one that you have not already earned.) Discuss with your counselor what kind of science, technology, engineering, or math was used in the adventure.
  3. Wolf Cub Scouts

    Bear Cub Scouts

    Adventures in Coins

    A Bear Goes Fishing

    Collections and Hobbies

    Bear Picnic

    Digging in the Past

    Critter Care

    Germs Alive

    Webelos Scouts

    Grow Something

    Camper

     

    Earth Rocks

     

    Maestro


  4. Act like a scientist! Explore EACH of the following:
    1. With your counselor, choose a question you would like to investigate.
      Here are some examples only (you may get other ideas from your adventure activities):
      1. Why do rockets have fins? Is there any connection between the feathers on arrows and fins on rockets?
      2. Why do some cars have spoilers? How do spoilers work?
      3. If there is a creek or stream in your neighborhood, where does it go? Does your stream flow to the Atlantic or the Pacific ocean?
      4. With your parent's or guardian's permission and assistance, you may want to use an online mapping application to follow the streams and rivers to the ocean. Keep track of the names of the streams, lakes, and rivers connecting your stream to the ocean. Is it possible for you to find out the name of your watershed? Paddle-to-the-Sea by Holling C. Holling is a fun book on this topic.

      5. Is the creek or stream in your neighborhood or park polluted?
      6. You can do a stream sample to find out what kinds of things are living in the water and under the rocks. Some things can survive in polluted water; others can live only in clean water. You can discover if a stream is polluted by finding out what lives there.

      7. What other activity can you think of that involves some kind of scientific questions or investigation?
    2. With your counselor, use the scientific method/process to investigate your question. Keep records of your question, the information you found, how you investigated, and what you found out about your question.
    3. You may do 3B with another Cub Scout if you would like, but you need to do and record your own work.

    4. Discuss your investigation and findings with your counselor.
  5. Visit a place where science is being done, used, or explained, such as one of the following: zoo, aquarium, water treatment plant, observatory, science museum, weather station, fish hatchery, or any other location where science is being done, used, or explained.
    1. During your visit, talk to someone in charge about science.
    2. Discuss with your counselor the science done, used, or explained at the place you visited.
  6. Discuss with your counselor how science affects your everyday life.
  

Tech Talk

This module is designed to help you explore how technology affects your life each day.

  1. Choose A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements.
    1. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show about anything related to technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

      Some examples include—but are not limited to—shows found on PBS ("NOVA"), Discovery Channel, Science Channel, National Geographic Channel, TED Talks (online videos), and the History Channel. You may choose to watch a live performance or movie at a planetarium or science museum instead of watching a media production. You may watch online productions with your counselor's approval and under your parent's supervision.

    2. Read (about one hour total) about anything related to technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
      3. Books on many topics may be found at your local library. Examples of magazines include but are not limited to Odyssey, KIDS DISCOVER, National Geographic Kids, Highlights, and OWL or owlkids.com.

    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about anything related to technology. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  2. Complete ONE adventure from the following list. (Choose one that you have not already earned.) Discuss with your counselor what kind of science, technology, engineering, or math was used in the adventure.
  3. Wolf Cub Scouts

    Webelos Scouts

    Finding Your Way

    Build It

    Motor Away

    Fix It

    Bear Cub Scouts

    Movie Making

    Make It Move

     

    A World of Sound

     

  4. Explore EACH of the following:
    1. Look up a definition of the word technology and discuss the meaning with your counselor.
    2. Find out how technology is used in EACH of the following fields:
      1. Communication
      2. Business
      3. Construction
      4. Sports
      5. Entertainment
    3. Discuss your findings with your counselor.
  5. Visit a place where technology is being designed, used, or explained, such as one of the following: an amusement park, a police or fire station, a radio or television station, a newspaper office, a factory or store, or any other location where technology is being designed, used, or explained.
    1. During your visit, talk to someone in charge about the following:
      1. The technologies used where you are visiting
      2. Why the organization is using these technologies
    2. Discuss with your counselor the technology that is designed, used, or explained at the place you visited.
  6. Discuss with your counselor how technology affects your everyday life.
  

Swing!

This module is designed to help you explore how engineering and simple machines called levers affect your life each day.

  1. Choose A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements.
    1. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show about anything related to motion or machines. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

      Some examples include—but are not limited to—shows found on PBS ("NOVA"), Discovery Channel, Science Channel, National Geographic Channel, TED Talks (online videos), and the History Channel. You may choose to watch a live performance or movie at a planetarium or science museum instead of watching a media production. You may watch online productions with your counselor's approval and under your parent's supervision.

    2. Read (about one hour total) about anything related to motion or machines. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

      Books on many topics may be found at your local library. Examples of magazines include but are not limited to Odyssey, KIDS DISCOVER, National Geographic Kids, Highlights, and OWL or owlkids.com.

    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about anything related to motion or machines. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  2. Complete ONE adventure from the following list. (Choose one that you have not already earned.) Discuss with your counselor what kind of science, technology, engineering, or math was used in the adventure.
  3. Wolf Cub Scouts

    Webelos Scouts

    Motor Away

    Adventures in Science

    Paws of Skill

    Engineer

    Bear Cub Scouts

    Sportsman

    Baloo the Builder

     

    A Bear Goes Fishing

     

  4. Explore EACH of the following.
    1. Levers
      1. Make a list or drawing of the three types of levers. (A lever is one kind of simple machine.)
      2. Show:
        1. How each lever works
        2. How the lever in your design will move something
        3. The class of each lever
        4. Why we use levers
    2. On your own, design, including a drawing, sketch, or model, ONE of the following:
      1. A playground fixture that uses a lever
      2. A game or sport that uses a lever
      3. An invention that uses a lever

      Be sure to show how the lever in your design will move something.

    1. Discuss your findings with your counselor.
  5. Do the following:
    1. Visit a place that uses levers, such as a playground, carpentry shop, construction site, restaurant kitchen, or any other location that uses levers.
    2. Discuss with your counselor the equipment or tools that use levers in the place you visited.

    Visitations to places like carpentry shops, construction sites, restaurant kitchens, etc., will require advance planning by the counselor. The counselor should call ahead to make arrangements, and make plans to have appropriate supervision of all Scouts.
    The site will very likely have rules and instructions that must be followed. The counselor should help ensure that all the participants are aware of and follow those rules. This may include safety procedures and other instructions.

  6. Discuss with your counselor how engineering and simple machines affect your everyday life.
  

1-2-3 Go!

This module is designed to help you explore how math affects your life each day.

Math and physics are used in almost every kind of invention, including cars, airplanes, and telescopes. Math also includes cryptography, the use of secret codes.

  1. Choose A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements.
    1. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show that involves math or physics. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
      3. Some examples include—but are not limited to—shows found on PBS ("NOVA"), Discovery Channel, Science Channel, National Geographic Channel, TED Talks (online videos), and the History Channel. You may choose to watch a live performance or movie at a planetarium or science museum instead of watching a media production. You may watch online productions with your counselor's approval and under your parent's supervision.


    2. Read (about one hour total) about anything that involves math or physics. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

      Books on many topics may be found at your local library. Examples of magazines include but are not limited to Odyssey, KIDS DISCOVER, National Geographic Kids, Highlights, and OWL or owlkids.com.

    3. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about anything that involves math or physics. Then do the following:
      1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
      2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.
  2. Complete ONE adventure from the following list. (Choose one that you have not already earned.) Discuss with your counselor what kind of science, technology, engineering, or math was used in the adventure.
  3. Wolf Cub Scouts

    Code of the Wolf

    Bear Cub Scouts

    Robotics

    Webelos Scouts

    Game Design

  4. Explore TWO options from A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements for those options. Keep your work to share with your counselor. The necessary information to make your calculations can be found in a book or on the Internet. (See the Helpful Links box for ideas.) You may work with your counselor on these calculations.
    1. Choose TWO of the following places and calculate how much you would weigh there.
      1. On the sun or the moon
      2. On Jupiter or Pluto
      3. On a planet that you choose
    2. Choose ONE of the following and calculate its height:
      1. A tree
      2. Your house
      3. A building of your choice
    3. Calculate the volume of air in your bedroom. Make sure your measurements have the same units—all feet or all inches—and show your work.

    Volume = Length × Width × Height

  5. Secret Codes
    1. Look up, then discuss with your counselor each of the following:
      1. Cryptography
      2. At least three ways secret codes or ciphers are made
      3. How secret codes and ciphers relate to mathematics
    2. Design a secret code or cipher. Then do the following:
      1. Write a message in your code or cipher.
      2. Share your code or cipher with your counselor.
  6. Discuss with your counselor how math affects your everyday life.
    

Cub Scout Supernova Award

To earn the Cub Scout Supernova award, you must be a Bear or Wolf Cub Scout who is active with a den. With your parent's and unit leader's help, you must select a council-approved mentor who is a registered Scouter. You may NOT choose your parent or your unit leader (unless the mentor is working with more than one youth).

A Note to the Counselor
The Cub Scout Supernova award recognizes superior achievement by a Cub Scout in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).
All experiments or projects should be conducted using the highest level of safety protocol and always under the supervision of a qualified, responsible adult.
Tigers are not eligible to earn the Cub Scout Supernova award.
Although it is not a requirement, it is recommended that you earn at least two of the four Nova awards for Cub Scouts before earning the Dr. Luis W. Alvarez Supernova Award.

Dr. Luis W. Alvarez Supernova Award
For Cub Scouts
This Supernova award can be earned by Cub Scouts like you who want to soar in science.

Requirements

  1. Complete both of the adventures appropriate for your rank.
  2. Wolf Cub Scouts

    Bear Cub Scouts

    Air of the Wolf

    Make It Move

    Code of the Wolf

    Super Science

  3. Complete the following adventure appropriate for your rank.
  4. Wolf Cub Scouts

    Bear Cub Scouts

    Call of the Wild

    Forensics OR Marble Madness

  5. Find interesting facts about Dr. Luis W. Alvarez using resources in your school or local library or on the Internet (with your parent's or guardian's permission and guidance). Then discuss what you learn with your mentor, including answers to the following questions: What very important award did Dr. Alvarez earn? What was his famous theory about dinosaurs?
  6. Find out about three other famous scientists, technology innovators, engineers, or mathematicians approved by your mentor. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.
  7. Speak with your teacher(s) at school (or your parents if you are home-schooled) OR one of your Cub Scout leaders about your interest in earning the Cub Scout Supernova award. Ask them why they think math and science are important in your education. Discuss what you learn with your mentor.
  8. Participate in a science project or experiment in your classroom or school OR do a special science project approved by your teacher. Discuss this activity with your mentor.
  9. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Visit with someone who works in a STEM-related career. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.
    2. Learn about a career that depends on knowledge about science, technology, engineering, or mathematics. Discuss what you learned with your mentor.
  10. Learn about the scientific method (or scientific process). Discuss this with your mentor, and include a simple demonstration to show what you learned.
  11. Participate in a Nova- or other STEM-related activity in your Cub Scout den or pack meeting that is conducted by a Boy Scout or Venturer who is working on his or her Supernova award. If this is not possible, participate in another Nova- or STEM-related activity in your den or pack meeting.
  12. Submit an application for the Cub Scout Supernova award to the district Nova or advancement committee for approval.